Kyoko Altman at PostGlobal

Kyoko Altman

Hong Kong, China

Kyoko Altman has worked as a correspondent and anchor for CNN and CNBC, and as a news-magazine reporter for Japan's top-ranked news program 'News Station' on TV Asahi. She has covered more than twenty countries. Close.

Kyoko Altman

Hong Kong, China

Kyoko Altman has worked as a correspondent and anchor for CNN and CNBC, and as a news-magazine reporter for Japan's top-ranked news program 'News Station' on TV Asahi. more »

Main Page | Kyoko Altman Archives | PostGlobal Archives


Distrust of National Leaders a Good Sign

Mistrust of leadership is one signal that the media is doing its job.

» Back to full entry

All Comments (4)

JOAO DA ROCHA:

Está realmente faltando ao mundo, lideranças que se preocupem com a vida de mais de 6,5 bilhões de seres humanos que habitam o nosso planeta.
Está havendo muito individualismo, demagogia e pouca credibilidade na competencia das pessoas que nos governam. A corrupção está se alastrando imediatamente e os país que formam o G-15 poderiam se unir para planejar e eleger prioridades para o Mundo.
O capital especulativo internacional está cada vez mais cartelizado e os governos cada vez mais individualizados e enfraquecidos.
Os países do BRIC poderiam e podem muito bem, se unirem em uma pauta de interesse da Humanidade. Está faltando isso e urgentemente. O mundo tem que conservar as conquistas e corrigir os erros.
FMI e ONU não podem deixar que a especulação perversa, continue concentrando riquezas e criando mais pobreza.

Birddog:

Ms. Altman:

Kind of screwball thinking it seems to me...
I mean certainly we in this country would not like our leadership's flaw's or transgressions glossed over by the media-We can see for ourselves what that garners, in the form of Bush's unexamined push into Iraq and our messed-up economy. However, To suggest that it would be a good thing for the media to be constantly hunting for ways to expose a politician for even minor trespass in the name of transparency, simply leads to self serving inquisitions ala the Lewinsky affair.I think what is needed instead is a return to a more professional and objective approch to reporting the news that folks such as William R. Murrow, Huntly/Brinckly, Walter Cronkite and late Tim Russert practiced...
Certainly less of the Got-cha media shake and bake that passes for journalism on Fox, the late night talk shows and much of the Internet would go a long way toward reestablishing public trust in the media and may encourage our leadership to act more responsibly in the end.

Birddog

the dudicus:

"Ban is not a national leader. As the head of an international organization, he has limited power to do much on his own."

Two points:
1. It's easy to be liked if you don't do anything and don't have the power to do everything. Who hates the Seychelles? I bet their approval ratings are quite high.

2. Media organizations are one-worlders who think the UN is the last best hope, rather than the US. Therefore, they don't promote horrific UN scandals. If the media reported "oil for food" or "rape cases and forced slavery among UN relief workers" the same way they reported Abu Garib, Katrina, or Haditha, the UN's ratings would be lower than Bush's.

BZ:

If you people in the corporate media had the guts to conduct a poll of your own standing with the public, I think you'd find you are trusted even less.

PostGlobal is an interactive conversation on global issues moderated by Newsweek International Editor Fareed Zakaria and David Ignatius of The Washington Post. It is produced jointly by Newsweek and washingtonpost.com, as is On Faith, a conversation on religion. Please send us your comments, questions and suggestions.