Hossein Derakhshan at PostGlobal

Hossein Derakhshan

Canada/Iran

Iranian-born Hossein "Hoder" Derakhshan is a blogger, journalist, and internet activist. Since 2001, he has been based out of Toronto, Canada, running his award-winning weblog, Editor: Myself, which has been among the most influential blogs in the Persian language. Close.

Hossein Derakhshan

Canada/Iran

Iranian-born Hossein "Hoder" Derakhshan is a blogger, journalist, and internet activist. more »

Main Page | Hossein Derakhshan Archives | PostGlobal Archives


TV confessions undermine the reality of American plans to destabilise Iran

Esfandiari, Jahanbegloo and Tajbakhsh's tv 'confessions' is only targeted at the ordinary Iranians inside Iran and the fact that they're broadcasting it on the Channel 1 confirms that.

But there is also another delicate detail no one has paid attention to yet that explains what exactly Iranian intelligence system is trying to achieve:

The above mentioned people, at least in the TV spots shown so far, are characterised as experts, not as prisoners.

The average man or woman in Iran who doesn't read newspapers or watch satellite television or simply doesn't follow politics has no idea about the conditions in which these individuals have said these things and would only be introduced to them as international relations experts. (The set where they are interviewed and their cloths also want to portray them as if they are in their offices or their homes.)

Personally I think it's a mistake by the Iranian government to assume such distinction or gap between the internal public opinion and external one.

Simply because of the widely popular foreign-based Persian-language satellite televisions such as the VOA and the forthcoming BBC are covering a considerable portion of the same people Iranian government try to target.

So in a few days the news that these statements were taken under pressure would be everywhere, mostly thanks to the popular VOA, and it would lose its value and effect.

I personally agree with legitimate and effective methods to expose the real intentions behind the American human rights and democracy project in countries such as Iran, Syria, Cuba, Venezuela, Russia and many eastern European states.

But I believe these televised confessions are neither legally or ethically justified, nor are effective once people realise the story behind them. They even have an opposite effect since the average Iranians would think that there is no truth to anything anyone says along the same lines.

The Americans have repeated and publicly expressed their interest in using the civil society, especially student, women and labour movement, in Iran to destabilise the government and these are exposed by the US' own mainstream media.

But what Iran does with these televised confessions undermine all these realities and help the opposition to paint them as propaganda or conspiracy theories.

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