Annie Wang at PostGlobal

Annie Wang

Shanghai, China

Annie Wang is a journalist, public speaker, and author who specializes women’s issue. She has published eight Chinese books and two English novels. Her English debut, Lili - A Novel of Tiananmen, (June 2001 Pantheon Books) published internationally to critical acclaims. A multi-layered novel, Lili, is a story of a "bad girl's" maturation and adventure in the Post-Mao Era leading up the Tiananmen Student Movement in 1989. Her most recent English novel, The People’s Republic of Desire (Harper Collins 2006) is a hilarious satire and an insightful portrait of China’s MTV generation, urban women, and cross-cultural relationships. It has been hailed as a cross between Sex and the City and Joy Luck Club. A child prodigy in her native China, Annie Wang studied mass communications at UC Berkeley and won the Berkeley Poetry Contest in 1996 with two poems, "Speaking to Mao Tse-tung, Tongue-in-cheek" and "A Woman from a Mountain Area". She has worked for high-tech companies in Silicon Valley, and then served in the Washington Post's Beijing bureau and the US State Department. In 2004, she returned to China and ran a fashion magazine in Shanghai. Currently, she lives with her husband and son and divides time between the U.S. and China. Close.

Annie Wang

Shanghai, China

Annie Wang is a journalist, public speaker, and author who specializes women’s issue. She has published eight Chinese books and two English novels. more »

Main Page | Annie Wang Archives | PostGlobal Archives


Emperors, Concubines and Politics Today

China has it's own versions of American Idol and the Apprentice, but the most popular TV shows are still soap operas about imperial China. When you cannot talk about politics openly and freely, talking history can serve as subtle political commentary on the present.

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All Comments (11)

homa:

please send for me about politics iran from your archive in date> march/april.1982,pp.10-11 .
thanks
my mail> ali1to3@yahoo.com

homa:

please send for me about politics iran from your archive in date> march/april.1982,pp.10-11 .
thanks
my mail> ali1to3@yahoo.com

homa:

please send for me about politics iran from your archive in date> march/april.1982,pp.10-11 .
thanks
my mail> ali1to3@yahoo.com

Maurizio Maccani:

Fantastic Post, a true insight in china life.
Soap opera is a way to criticise in a way comprehensible to EVERYBODY current social problems, also in =free= countries soap opera is ogten used for that.
Maurizio sales@www.brazilian-cinema.com

haad:

i just want to say if you can tell are there still emporerors today in china ?if so where if you know please contact me on my phone my number is 773 267-0292 or email me at kingofganster@yahoo.com

Noah:

The phenomenon of "second wives" and mistresses will lead to the breakdown of the traditional family, which will lead to much lower birthrates (as has happened in richer Asian countries already). This is an excellent development, both for China and the world. China is already vastly overpopulated, its resources stretched almost to the breaking point. China's only hope is to reduce its population. If the best way to accomplish that is to reorient people away from their families and toward casual sex, so be it.

Anonymous:

Smart and cute.

gyrus:

This is nothing new to Chinese political culture. Throughout the ages, Chinese poets have been writing about the past as a form of commentary on the current regime.

However, the time periods featured in these poems (or TV series) often highlights the "tone" of the piece. Not until the TV shows are about the fall of the Tang, or some other corrupt and decaying dynasty can we correctly observe that this represents a change in the political landscape.

The scales of the dragon change color in the light, but it's still the dragon.

David Ignatius, PostGlobal:

This is fascinating, Annie--a real window into today's China. Perhaps our American problem is that we lack role models. We have empire (of a sort) but no emperors. I sometimes wonder if the American obsession with the Founding Fathers (every month a new book emerges about one of our 18th century savants) reflect a need to reassure ourselves that we weren't always such bumblers.

John:

"Many young women would rather take the position of a rich man's mistress than be a poor man’s wife."

Any why shouldn't they?

Anju Chandel, New Delhi, India:

China has progressed very fast economically with world-class infrastructure to boast off, Shanghai being perhaps 'the best' in the world in this aspect! If only China learnt fast that by having a free media you can grow even faster (I mean, economically!), China would certainly become one of the best places on the earth!

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