how the world sees america

Press Release

Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive’s PostGlobal Launches
“How the World Sees America”
Site Explores the Love-Hate Relationship with America through Unique First-Hand Global Commentary

www.washingtonpost.com/america

WASHINGTON, May 16, 2007 – Armed only with a journalist’s curiosity, a digital video camera, a starting point, a rough itinerary and few seconds to capture a compelling story; Amar Bakshi wants to know what individuals around the world really think about America – why some love us, why some hate us and how we affect their lives day-to-day. Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive (WPNI), the online publishing subsidiary of The Washington Post Company, today announced the launch of “How the World Sees America,” a new multimedia blog on PostGlobal, the online conversation on global issues moderated by Washington Post Columnist, David Ignatius and Newsweek International Editor Fareed Zakaria. (http://newsweek.washingtonpost.com/postglobal).

Through daily 30-second video clips and blog entries, PostGlobal correspondent and videographer, Amar Bakshi, 23, will ask readers to help guide his itinerary, interviews and questions as he puts a human face on what the global community really thinks about America.

“With ‘How the World Sees America’ we are promoting a new type of global commentary. By combining in-the-field reporting and emerging technology, PostGlobal can now share multimedia stories about people and places in the news. We can connect America and the world in a new way, and explore the reasons for America's growing unpopularity in many countries,” says David Ignatius award-winning journalist and moderator of PostGlobal.
“Bakshi has the opportunity to get behind the rhetoric and interview real people for insight into how U.S. policy, events and culture affect the world.”

The first leg of Bakshi’s exploration takes him to the United Kingdom, Pakistan and India. Subsequent destinations will be dictated by world events and reader suggestions; perhaps Egypt and Iran, China and Japan or Mexico and Venezuela. One day Bakshi may feature interviews from a protest rally on the streets of Islamabad, another may offer perspectives from an underground rave in Manchester, and on yet another day, he may share insights from a factory worker in Bangalore.

“This is a significant break from other forms of online journalism where a videographer spends three weeks making a 5 minute clip,” states Amar Bakshi. “Everyday readers can follow my journey in detail. The idea is to get them involved in some of the decision making that goes into ‘How the World Sees America’,” he adds.

PostGlobal provides a running discussion of important issues among dozens of the world's best-known editors, writers and journalists. Now, through the “How the World Sees America,” project, PostGlobal offers readers an even more immediate response to those issues. Through glimpses into interesting lives, reactions to world issues and events and diverse perspectives on the United States from shopkeepers, students, small town officials, entertainers, booksellers and carpet makers, readers can interact with a cross-section of the global community.

“The goal of ‘How the World Sees America’ is to foster a global community of users who wish to create an open dialogue with one another. Not just about politics, but also about each other’s everyday way of life.” says Bakshi. “It is an opportunity to explore and engage in conversation about topics that may otherwise not receive exposure in mainstream media. Ultimately, this project will show the humanity of distant populations.”

Since its launch in June 2006, PostGlobal has offered a dynamic running discussion of important issues. Each Monday and Thursday, they post a question for responses from members of a diverse network of more than 40 commentators from 32 countries in six regions around the globe— from China to Iran, South Africa to Saudi Arabia, Mexico to India – wherever news is happening. Natalie Ahn is PostGlobal’s Editor/Producer.

# # #

Media Contacts:

Kris Coratti
Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive
Office: 703-469-2763
Mobile: 571-236-7035
Kris.Coratti@wpni.com

Donna Drew Sawyer
Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive
Office: 703-469-2965
Mobile: 240-505-5382
Donna.Sawyer@wpni.com

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Comments (2)

Stephen Brexel:

Dec. 28, 2007
Last Friday of the month

Discovering the common fertile ground treasure and the logical ground in our lives with talent time and treasure and realizing avon calling is intentional sin.

It makes sense in reviewing the almost 2.7 billion dollars paid by the Catholic church in lawsuits to private attorney's and consultants whereby approximately 2 billion went to the legal services over the past 10 years causes this one to
think about the origination of the racketeering law put into place in what state it came from and what federal bill was passed as well as the origination and placement of the guardian laws strategically implemented as well. The education system and computer programing of those involved seems to be directly connected to security, state and federal access as well as various diversification with construction products, restaurants, chauffeured vehicles, warehouses as well as airline industry connections for the coming and going issues with the obvious motor vehicle department connections that seemed to follow in USA and now the world. The direct and indirect connection of said issues and items at all levels has seem to be seasoned with FBI, CIA, Justice department involvement with easy access to Supreme Court Judges for approvals and expenditures with questionable so called safe houses with inflated prices as well as computer services with attachments and tentacles. The cost per man on dollars spent tells us they are over spending and justifing the figures would require crisis management and fallacy issues and items.The ability to tap phones and computers on the network and web as well as legal and credit history for pre-profile of individuals seems to be a premeditated and the definition of racketeering law broken as well as connection and involvement with paid services of questionable connections. The crossing over state lines requires special filing with most states for legal disclosure and SEC for legal advertisements breaking more laws. A preexisting course of actions would seem to have involvement with forged printed money, laundering money, large banks, foreign government individuals and trafficking and prostitution with illegal aliens for private indulgences with young girls. The stateside tentacles and web connections to the World Trade Center Department of Law with the central storehouse of information.

Stephen Brexel
1000 N. US-1 J-103
Jupiter Florida 33477
sbrex2000@aol.com

Stephen Brexel:

Dec. 28, 2007
Last Friday of the month

Discovering the common fertile ground treasure and the logical ground in our lives with talent time and treasure and realizing avon calling is intentional sin.

It makes sense in reviewing the almost 2.7 billion dollars paid by the Catholic church in lawsuits to private attorney's and consultants whereby approximately 2 billion went to the legal services over the past 10 years causes this one to
think about the origination of the racketeering law put into place in what state it came from and what federal bill was passed as well as the origination and placement of the guardian laws strategically implemented as well. The education system and computer programing of those involved seems to be directly connected to security, state and federal access as well as various diversification with construction products, restaurants, chauffeured vehicles, warehouses as well as airline industry connections for the coming and going issues with the obvious motor vehicle department connections that seemed to follow in USA and now the world. The direct and indirect connection of said issues and items at all levels has seem to be seasoned with FBI, CIA, Justice department involvement with easy access to Supreme Court Judges for approvals and expenditures with questionable so called safe houses with inflated prices as well as computer services with attachments and tentacles. The cost per man on dollars spent tells us they are over spending and justifing the figures would require crisis management and fallacy issues and items.The ability to tap phones and computers on the network and web as well as legal and credit history for pre-profile of individuals seems to be a premeditated and the definition of racketeering law broken as well as connection and involvement with paid services of questionable connections. The crossing over state lines requires special filing with most states for legal disclosure and SEC for legal advertisements breaking more laws. A preexisting course of actions would seem to have involvement with forged printed money, laundering money, large banks, foreign government individuals and trafficking and prostitution with illegal aliens for private indulgences with young girls. The stateside tentacles and web connections to the World Trade Center Department of Law with the central storehouse of information.

Stephen Brexel
1000 N. US-1 J-103
Jupiter Florida 33477
sbrex2000@aol.com

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PostGlobal is an interactive conversation on global issues moderated by Newsweek International Editor Fareed Zakaria and David Ignatius of The Washington Post. It is produced jointly by Newsweek and washingtonpost.com, as is On Faith, a conversation on religion. Please send your comments, questions and suggestions for PostGlobal to Lauren Keane, its editor and producer.