A Growing Global Agenda


PostGlobal celebrates its second birthday this week. Is there a growing global agenda -- that is, an agenda of issues being discussed that affects the world rather than individual countries? Or are local concerns still paramount?

Posted by Lauren Keane on June 11, 2008 10:18 AM

Readers’ Responses to Our Question (19)

Anonymous :

The bill to ratify the Lisbon Treaty completed its passage through the British parliament Wednesday after a last-ditch attempt by Conservatives to delay the process failed.

Tony Wilmers :

Dear Recipient,

For a few years now when my delightful young carer slaves away here in Sydney, Australia each Sunday and also on other days, my computer is connected to WNYC2 in itunes. Your address was supplied by google when I enquired to contact WNYC2, while I'm at present reading Musicophilia - Tales of Music and the Brain, pertinent to me as in '96 I was Brain Injured as my car just set off from my traffic lights, . Could you possibly inform me their e-mail address, as I feel compelled to tell them of my minor complaint about opera that I think will not make one iota of difference to what music play at their esteemed establishment.

Tony Wilmers
down unda

Anju Chandel, New Delhi, India :

Happy Birthday, PostGlobal! For the first time, frankly, I have found David Ignatius' and Fareed Zakaria's pictures with shiny paper-hats relevant!

Well, in socio-economic-political context, all countries of the world will have to "think local but act global" as we share an inter-linked fate.

PostGlobal is an excellent effort. Keep it up!

BobL-VA :

Come on. The very system Bush/Conservatives/Liberals/Europeans/just about everyone else runs arounds and touts as desirable forms of government are by their very nature limited when it comes to global issues. Elected officals have consituents who they must pander to if they want to be re-elected. Constituent issues are almost always local or national in nature. Of course there are a few exceptions to this rule, but frankly not enough to mention.

Global issues are viewed by the electorate as issues they want their elected leaders to manipulate to their advantage. Most people in the US could care less if the average Saudi was dirt poor and living in tents as long as they could pay a buck a gallon for gas. I'm probably not a great bleeding heart liberal becuase I'm not sure I would care either.

The majority of global issues and interactions today are business dealings pure and simple. The majority of these are designed to give developed countries cheaper goods and services then they would be able to produce themselves. Why pay $30,000 for a car really built in the US when you pay $25,000 for same car using Mexican labor? Why pay $19.99 for a meal in a restaurant when you can pay $14.99 for the same thing thanks to illegals? Has anyone actually talked to a customer service rep lately that wasn't in India? Doubtful.

I have always believed our attack on Iraq had more to do with trying to stabilize the region in order to assure a consistant and uninterrupted flow of oil then it ever had to do with terrorism. The corporations of the developed world are interested in profits (and I'm saying this in a negative way) and globalization has really occured as a result of better technology, better transportation and supplies of cheap labor pools around the globe. Globalization has very little to do with anything else.

D.Hodara :

Robert of Los Angeles

Forgot in my previous comment Warming. Indeed men have been attacking Nature and Nature is taking its revenge. Once again, only immediate interests are taken in consideration regarding safeguarding Nature.
As we elect politicians around the world, we may be considered 'responsible' of their actions, but once they are elected we seem to be helpless as regards their actions while in office.

D. Hodara :

ROber of Los Angeles.

My interpretation of Miklos's three W's is that our politicians have constantly been trying to solve problems with short term decisions, whilst the world needs long term projections.
In my opinion, with the world's exponential increase in population - homo sapiens took about 40000 years to develop the world's population to about 1.5 billion people in January 1900 and only about 100 years to reach 6.5 billion people - without long term projection to accompany such an increase leads to frictions, including wars, with an immediate big problem CLEAN WATER. This problem is more acute than oil, as water = LIFE!

Robert of Los Angeles :

But D. Hodara, what do his words mean?
Boiled down his "argument" is " 3 big problems, both global and local. Don't talk about them, but ACT"

________________

You can make whatever you want from these words.
Ah, here's my take.

As we experience European midsummer "Warming", many middle aged guys like Miklos (and I) may forget to visit aged parents with "Water", and thus once again practice a passive "War" against aging, even though it rapidly approaches for all of us.

Yes, Miklos gets to the heart of an overarching Glocal problem, the wrenching dilemmas of bioethics on the value we put on human life, in whole or in "parts", in a most oblique and poetic way. The man is a GENIUS!!

Pretorian :

I can only hope for an all out clash that will unseat these "global politicos" and their biased media supporters. It is time for the people to have a voice and not have things shoved down their throats by all the "trapos".

Politicos, cor[porations and media giants making billions off the backs of us all and only looking for their own pocket lining. Food, fuel and medical is controlled by how much they can bleed from what they deem "serfs" whise opinion does not count... we know what you need better than you. Abolish the UN and its gaggle of criminals. they say global conformity i say global insurection against the corporations and politicos

D. Hodara :

Contrary to a number of the comments, I am of the opinion that Miklos Vamos has expressed a very sound and lucid description of how he sees the most urgent problems facing the world.
Keep him as a contributor.

Robert of Los Angeles :

Well, Pro Aliquo since Miklos has "registration required", a peon like me cannot talk to the Grand Pee-Pee (well that fits the Water W).

1. ...3 big Ws are literally GLOCAL concerns (both global and local)
(Well that clears up what the heck you and Miklos are issues or solutions. NOT!!)

2. .. time to talk and, when everything has been said, there is a time to act. ...stop talking and ..act
(OH the whole "debate is OVER" meme -- whether on global warming or on terrorism since the global "media elite" and their appointed like Gore on climate and Fareed and his ilk in some corners at least on "War".

Sorry don't buy that. And the Water thing as "Glocal"???. Water? Water! Oil and gas resources I can understand, but water. I know it's a problem but it's local with some cross border concerns and with proper action solvable at that level.


3. ...hope that on those glocal issues, the next President of the United States of America will act...
( To do WHAT?! Specifically on what particulars. The ONLY thing I KNOW you and Miklos are talking about is that the next US President should ACT by ceding as MUCH SOVEREIGNTY to the global elite as you may request of him and US. )
NO THANKS!!!

Pro Aliquo :

Miklos Vamos writes: "Instead of stressing about the local concerns or on the ones that could be regarded as international, I think we should make a list of those that are the most urgent to cope with. I would put on my list the three “big Ws” first: Wars, Warming and Water. What can be said about them that has not been said yet? And, what can be said? I wonder if after the presidential elections in the U.S. some related measures could be found on the agenda of the glorious winner. That is the most important question in my opinion."

Three points:

1. Answering the question most creatively, the panelist points out that the three big Ws are literally GLOCAL concerns (both global and local) and need be considered as such.

2. The panelist also believes there is a time to talk and, when everything has been said, there is a time to act. The time has come to stop talking and to act, says he.

3. MV concludes by expressing the hope that on those glocal issues, the next President of the United States of America will act, at last, it being what matters the most at present.

It is clear that Miklos Vamos is a passionate, pragmatic survivor. On this loquacious island, he undoubtedly deserves and should therefore be awarded the title of "Permanent Panelist" -- and be referred to reverently, from now on, as "Miklos Vamos, PP.

Regards and, once again, Happy Birthday!

MikeB :

What delussional thinking! Of course local concerns are paramount. Leaders and businessmen from other countries talk about "global concerns", but all that really means is "How much are you suckers in the U.S. willing to give us?". Even France has a lower unemployment rate than the U.S., now. It is 7.5% *total*. Ours, based on people drawing their paltry 6 weeks of thin air, is above 5.5% and the real unemployment rate, based on people actuially looking for jobs, is closer to 12%. No one practices "free trade" like we do, every other country places their own citizens first and forces their corporations to act in the interests of their country. We, along with Somalia and Afghanistan and a few other failed states, are the only country that permits our businesses and investors to act like pirates and con artists, robber barrons, petty warlords, and treasonous swine.

D. Hodara :

Happy anniversary!
Globalization has created a situation in which everything that happens anywhere has a definite influence on the rest of the world.
Unfortunately, the people managing our destinies everywhere have a tendency to try to solve any problem on a day to day basis, rather than have a long term view. Consequently, we are now paying all the lack of long term projection of our politicians, who are at a loss to find how to handle all the mess we are now experiencing. The mess can be observed in all sectors of life on earth, whether climate, food, energy, social, health, economics, finances, violenc and above all the way to have all the countries of the world live in peace.
One day humans will realize that they use too little of their intelligence and let us hope in will not be too late!

Yousuf Hashmi :


Terms of reference for the editors is definately the issues which have some relevence with the global concerns.

In my opinion the local concerns should be given more priority because it will develop international recognition of those issues which normally do not get the international media attention

This is encouraging that there is a growth in global issues and therefore more local issues getting international coverage but the world is moving so fast that to keep its pace is very difficult and many local concerns are ignored.

Salamon :

BOBL-VA:
Thanks for your qualified support. I consciously left out global warming - not due to skepticism about the issue - but to concentrate the mind on the economic issue pertaining to growing demand for hydrocarbons v. falling/static output for 2-3 years with probable lack of sufficient new production to keep step with demand.

Succintly, the point attempted to be raised was that the contributors consider the wide extent of hydrocarbon use, aside from tranport/elecrticty production, and contemplate on the effect that there is no replacement for feed stock.

Robert of Los Angeles :

Let me take this opportunity of this vague and vacuous question, and his vague and vacuous response to ask why Miklos Vamos is a contributor here.

I would like to "vote him off the island" as viewers of the Survivor series might say.

Why? Do I disagree with him? No, some of the best blog conversations I've had have been on Post Global and Global Power Barometer with contributors and general commenters who I vigorously and sometimes vehemently disagree with.

But Vamos manages to say nothing, or say bland about just any topic he chooses, which he knows nothing about. He focuses on feelings, but hardly ever even passionately expresses himself.


He is a Vaclav Havel with nothing to say.
I am disappointed that a product and survivor of Communist oppression has no strong conclusions or focused opinions on autocracy or propaganda.

Indeed he swallows the moral relativism of the Western academia with the same old discredited undertones of deconstruction and socialism.

"I would put on my list the three “big Ws” first: Wars, Warming and Water. What can be said about them that has not been said yet? And, what can be said?"
(I guess NOTHING, huh?)

I wonder if after the presidential elections in the U.S. some related measures could be found on the agenda of the glorious winner. That is the most important question in my opinion.
(What does he REALLY know about our elections and whether they would change his life or his daughters ability to choose chocolate or ice cream?)

Really now Miklos, isn't the most important thing that you and your daughter have to think about is how to prevent ANYBODY whether American or Chinese or Islamist or homegrown autocrat from doing again to your country Hungary what the Soviets did, namely stifling of your liberty, in your case the freedom to make mediocre literature and trifling commentary?

Robert of Los Angeles :

Let me take this opportunity of this vague and vacuous question, and his vague and vacuous response to ask why Miklos Vamos is a contributor here.

I would like to "vote him off the island" as viewers of the Survivor series might say.

Why? Do I disagree with him? No, some of the best blog conversations I've had have been on Post Global and Global Power Barometer with contributors and general commenters who I vigorously and sometimes vehemently disagree with.

But Vamos manages to say nothing, or say bland about just any topic he chooses, which he knows nothing about. He focuses on feelings, but hardly ever even passionately expresses himself.


He is a Vaclav Havel with nothing to say.
I am disappointed that a product and survivor of Communist oppression has no strong conclusions or focused opinions on autocracy or propaganda.

Indeed he swallows the moral relativism of the Western academia with the same old discredited undertones of deconstruction and socialism.

"I would put on my list the three “big Ws” first: Wars, Warming and Water. What can be said about them that has not been said yet? And, what can be said?"
(I guess NOTHING, huh?)

I wonder if after the presidential elections in the U.S. some related measures could be found on the agenda of the glorious winner. That is the most important question in my opinion.
(What does he REALLY know about our elections and whether they would change his life or his daughters ability to choose chocolate or ice cream?)

Really now Miklos, isn't the most important thing that you and your daughter have to think about is how to prevent ANYBODY whether American or Chinese or Islamist or homegrown autocrat from doing again to your country Hungary what the Soviets did, namely stifling of your liberty, in your case the freedom to make mediocre literature and trifling commentary?

BobL-VA :

I have to agree with Salamon to some extent. While not all countries have an energy shortage or are paying through the nose for their energy the entire planet has to deal with global warming and the effects of green house gases. The enviroment affects us all.

That being said local, regional and national issues will still prevail as the dominate topic of conversation. What is closest to home is always easiest to understand and normally has a greater impact on one's life.

Salamon :

There is a missing agenda that effects the world, yet no one, especiqally MSM, and this blogspot wishes to look into:

The effect of rising hydrocarbons' costs and decreasing availability thereof [for the near future], how it will effect globalization, and the very exsistence of our cicilization? Different aspects thereto:

1\.,Tranport cost vs outsourcing
2., human appearal [for more and more of it is based on hydrocqarban derivatives]
3., Agriculture, from urea based fertilizer to all the herbacides and pesticides on which factorty farming depends.
4., Living space, with repsect to transport costs and exurbs/suburbs and rural areas producing necessary goods for civilized socety [agriculture, natural resources, power, etc].

I would greatly appreciate some salient comments to this issue as it will effect our children and grandchildren [notable that politicians always place the cost of todays' expenses on the future generations - as clearly evidenced by e.g.: the DECIDER's budget deficit/ fiancial deteriation of the USA economy

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